Eliminate Sustained Annular Pressure in P&A Wells

When it’s time to retire an oil and gas well for good, BioSqueeze® permanently eliminates methane leakage and sustained annular pressure in the well without having to return several times to meet regulations. For P&A jobs where a cement plug in the wellbore has already failed, BioSqueeze® can seal cracks in the cement plug to eliminate leaks without the need for any drill out.

BioSqueeze® can eliminate sustained annular pressure in plug and abandon wells using three different techniques, shown below.

Bottom Annular Gas Squeeze

Operator Preparation

Step 1:
Identify problem annulus through bond logging.

Step 2:
Place bridge plug and perforate or notch casing to target leakage pathways.

Step 3:
Set packer and run tubing to bottom perf/notch to squeeze into the annulus.

BioSqueeze® Execution

Step 4:
The first day, connect equipment and pump low-viscosity, environmentally friendly biomineralization solution in position downhole using tubing.

Step 5:
Pump fluids into problem annuli for about 6 hours, applying pressure to squeeze fluids deep into leakage pathways. Monitor injection rate and pressure until gas migration is eliminated.

Step 6:
Seal the well in overnight at pressure to continue to form the barrier.

Step 7:
The following day, return to continue pumping fluids, ensuring that all problem annuli are fully sealed.

Bullhead Squeeze

Operator Preparation

Step 1:
Identify problem annuli and ensure cement is to surface.

BioSqueeze® Execution

Step 2:
The first day, connect equipment and pump low-viscosity, environmentally friendly biomineralization solution into the cement at the top of the problem annulus.

Step 3:
Pump fluids into the annulus for about 6 hours, applying pressure to squeeze fluids deep into leakage pathways. Monitor injection rate and pressure until gas migration is eliminated.

Step 4:
Seal the well in overnight at pressure to continue to form the barrier.

Step 5:
The following day, return to continue pumping fluids, ensuring that micro annuli are fully sealed.

Deep Cement Top Squeeze

Operator Preparation

Step 1:
Set packer and run tubing to just above existing cement plug.

BioSqueeze® Execution

Step 2:
The first day, connect equipment and pump low-viscosity, environmentally friendly biomineralization solution into the leaking cement plug.

Step 3:
Pump fluids into the wellbore for about 6 hours, applying pressure to squeeze fluids deep into leakage pathways. Monitor injection rate and pressure until gas migration is eliminated.

Step 4:
Seal the well in overnight at pressure to continue to form the barrier.

Step 5:
The following day, return to continue pumping fluids, ensuring that all micro annuli are fully sealed.

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BioSqueeze®  on “Difficult” Plug and Abandon Well

Case Studies

BioSqueeze® on “Difficult” Plug and Abandon Well

BioSqueeze Inc. was contracted by an operator in the DJ Basin of Colorado to remediate high bradenhead pressure (sustained annular pressure) on a well slated for abandonment.

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BioSqueeze® Seals Two Leaking Annuli with One Treatment

Case Studies

BioSqueeze® Seals Two Leaking Annuli with One Treatment

BioSqueeze Inc. was contracted by a company in Pennsylvania to mitigate casing pressure in both the 9 5/8” x 7” - 85 psi and 13 3/8” x 9 5/8” - 55 psi annuli.

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BioSqueeze® Eliminates Annular Pressure Via Surface Squeeze

Case Studies

BioSqueeze® Eliminates Annular Pressure Via Surface Squeeze

BioSqueeze Inc. was contracted by an operator in Ohio to eliminate annular pressure in a well in the process of being retired. The well was leaking from the 13-3/8 in x 9-5/8 in annulus and had several cement plugs in the wellbore, preventing downhole access for a standard perf and squeeze.

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BioSqueeze® Seals a Leaking Cement Plug in a Previously Abandoned Well

Case Studies

BioSqueeze® Seals a Leaking Cement Plug in a Previously Abandoned Well

BioSqueeze Inc. was contracted by an operator in Pennsylvania to seal a leak in the cement plug of a previously abandoned well.

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BioSqueeze® Eliminates Casing Pressure in a Well Slated for Abandonment

Case Studies

BioSqueeze® Eliminates Casing Pressure in a Well Slated for Abandonment

BioSqueeze Inc. was contracted by an operator to mitigate annular pressure in a well slated for abandonment.

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BioSqueeze® Seals an Annular Leak where Numerous Other Attempts had Failed

Case Studies

BioSqueeze® Seals an Annular Leak where Numerous Other Attempts had Failed

BioSqueeze Inc. was contracted by an operator to seal a leaking annulus in a well in the process of being abandoned. Previous attempts to seal the leak had little to no impact.

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BioSqueeze® Eliminates Sustained Casing Pressure in a Well being Decommissioned

Case Studies

BioSqueeze® Eliminates Sustained Casing Pressure in a Well being Decommissioned

BioSqueeze Inc. was contracted by an operator to eliminate annular pressure in a well in the process of being abandoned.

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BioSqueeze® Eliminates Bradenhead Pressure in a Well Prior to Abandonment

Case Studies

BioSqueeze® Eliminates Bradenhead Pressure in a Well Prior to Abandonment

BioSqueeze Inc. was contracted by an operator in Colorado to eliminate bradenhead pressure in a well slated for abandonment. Prior to our arrival, the well was prepared by perforating at 2,880 ft (gas source), 2,270 ft (channeling), and 870 ft (50 ft below surface casing shoe) through the 4-1/2 in casing string.

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BioSqueeze® Seals Micro Annulus No Other Technology Could Address

Case Studies

BioSqueeze® Seals Micro Annulus No Other Technology Could Address

BioSqueeze Inc. was contracted to mitigate annular gas on the 13-3/8 in x 9-5/8 in annulus on a previously plugged well in Ohio that multiple other attempts with cement, resin, etc. had failed to fix.

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BioSqueeze® Eliminates Gas Migration, Enabling Efficient Abandonment

Case Studies

BioSqueeze® Eliminates Gas Migration, Enabling Efficient Abandonment

BSI was contracted to eliminate gas migration on the backside of the 7” casing of a well being plugged in Pennsylvania. Bond logs indicated good cement, so a noise-temp log was used to identify the shallowest gas source (600’).

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